Tea Review: Eco Cha Tea Club Longan Charcoal Roasted Wuyi Oolong

ECO-CHA TEA CLUB: LONGAN CHARCOAL ROASTED WUYI OOLONG TEA

This month’s tea, Longan Charcoal Roasted Wuyi Oolong Tea, from Eco Cha Tea Club comes from Songbolin, Taiwan. It’s quite an extraordinary one, at least for me.  I’ve been drinking roasted oolongs from Taiwan a lot recently and this is the second time I’ve tried Longan charcoal roasted oolong. They constitute a nice alternative to the conventional floral green oolongs of Taiwan.

Anyway, this month’s tea is 100% organic and composed of spring and winter harvests of 2016. Dry leaves are tightly rolled and dark green. The smell of the leaves is roasty and slightly smoky.

I brewed it gongfu style by using about six grams of tea. It cupped out reddish-orange liquor with great clarity. The first thing that hits my palate is the taste of its strong roasty flavor alongside with subtle smoky taste in the background. There is also a fruity character although it’s hard to detect. So far so good! It’s sweet with no bitterness. The mouthfeel is thick and velvety. The aftertaste was persistent and left a nice refreshing minty feeling in the throat and mouth.

Overall, Longan Charcoal Roasted Wuyi Oolong from Eco Cha Tea Club is a great tea, particularly for those who are looking for highly and masterfully roasted oolongs. Highly recommended!

ECO-CHA TEA CLUB: LONGAN CHARCOAL ROASTED WUYI OOLONG TEA ECO-CHA TEA CLUB: LONGAN CHARCOAL ROASTED WUYI OOLONG TEA ECO-CHA TEA CLUB: LONGAN CHARCOAL ROASTED WUYI OOLONG TEA ECO-CHA TEA CLUB: LONGAN CHARCOAL ROASTED WUYI OOLONG TEA

Tea Review: Grand Tea Shi Feng Dragon Well Green Tea

Grand Tea Shi Feng Dragon Well Green Tea

Last week I reviewed Grand Tea Premium Jasmine Pearl Green Tea which is a decent representation of naturally flavored jasmine green teas. This week I’ll review Shi Feng Dragon Well Green Tea from Grand Tea which is a pre-Ming harvest of 2017.

Dragon Well (aka Longjing) is originated from Longjing village near Hangzhou in Zhejiang province. It’s arguably one of the top most popular teas of China. If you had the chance to try it you’d know why! I always try to keep some in my tea cupboard because dragon well is one of my go-to teas whenever I long for a smooth, refreshing green tea.

Dry leaves of this week’s tea are flat as with all dragon well teas but shorter than other dragon wells I’ve tried so far. They are quite light green and uniform in appearance. It’s pan-fried and roasted. The smell of dry leaves is grassy but not a strong one.

It cupped out light green-yellowish liquor with slightly cloudy appearance. It’s unexpectedly sweet and smooth with no astringency at all. Mouthfeel is mildly thick and velvety. It has got a tad touch of a grassy taste alongside with some floral tones in the background. The aftertaste is not persistent but leaves a refreshing, mellow taste in the mouth.

Grand Tea Shi Feng Dragon Well Green Tea Grand Tea Shi Feng Dragon Well Green Tea Grand Tea Shi Feng Dragon Well Green Tea

Tea Review: Grand Tea Premium Jasmine Green tea

 

Grand Tea Premium Jasmine Green Tea

I don’t consider myself a tea snob although there are times I feel like one.  The reason I’m telling you this because I’m not a great fan of flavored teas. And whenever I refuse to drink them when I am offered to do so, It feels like a bit tea snobbery. However, jasmine pearl green tea has been always one of the exemptions for me and always try to keep some in my cupboard. What I like most about this tea are its smell and aroma, not many teas out there to beat its enchanting scent of jasmine!

However, jasmine pearl green tea has been always one of the exemptions for me and always try to keep some in my cupboard. What I like most about this tea are its smell and aroma, not many teas out there to beat its enchanting scent of jasmine!

This week’s tea, Grand Tea Premium Jasmine Pearl, is naturally flavored with jasmine blossoms. As soon as you open the package beautiful smell of jasmine blossoms hits your nostril. Each pearl is made of two leaves and an unopened tea bud and processed as green tea.

I brewed it western style using 3 grams of tea for 200 ml glass teapot. It cupped out bright yellow liquor with great clarity. The aroma is even better than the smell of dry leaves. I’m not sure if the taste can beat the aroma! The taste is floral with slight grassy touch in the back. It’s quite smooth and sweet leaving a sense of calmness on the palate. There is not much in the aftertaste but a short lingering taste of jasmine blossoms.

Grand Tea Premium Jasmine Green Tea Grand Tea Premium Jasmine Green Tea Grand Tea Premium Jasmine Green Tea

Tea Review: Zhao Zhou Tea Jun Chiyabari Imperial Black Tea

Zhao Zhou Tea Jun Chiyabari Himalayan imperial Black Tea

About Jun Chiyabari

Jun Chiyabari (meaning “moon-lit tea garden”), arguably the most famous tea garden in Nepal, is a small family run tea farm located in the Himalayas in the eastern mountains of Nepal. Tea is grown organically and the elevation ranges from 1650m to 2100m.

About Zhao Zhou Tea

Zhao Zhou Tea, founded by Peter and Gabor,  is a tea house located in Budapest, Hungary (one more good reason to visit Budapest very soon!). They carry a wide range of tea selections on their website; they particularly focus on puer teas that are made out of ancient tea tree leaves in southern China. I loved the tea map on their website. You can go through it and learn a lot about teas from different countries and furthermore you can add any tea in your cart right on the map.

Jun Chiyabari Imperial Black Tea

Dry leaves of Jun Chiyabari Imperial Black Tea are neither short nor long and composed of slightly twisted black leaves. The smell is reminiscent of cocoa. When it’s brewed, it cupped out bright orangish red liquor with great clarity. The mouthfeel is thick, even though not as strong as Assam black teas. It’s slightly bitter, but nothing that bothers my palate. Quite contrary it’s very well balanced! The aftertaste is quite short yet leaving a nice touch of nutty feeling in the mouth. Overall, it’s a fantastic tea. Highly recommended for black tea aficionados!

Zhao Zhou Tea Jun Chiyabari Himalayan imperial Black Tea Zhao Zhou Tea Jun Chiyabari Himalayan imperial Black Tea Zhao Zhou Tea Jun Chiyabari Himalayan imperial Black Tea Zhao Zhou Tea Jun Chiyabari Himalayan imperial Black Tea Zhao Zhou Tea Jun Chiyabari Himalayan imperial Black Tea

Tea Review: Teabook Sun Set Red Tea

Teabook Sunset Red Tea
Dry leaves of Sunset Red Tea

About Teabook

Teabook, founded by Jeffrey McIntosh, is an online tea store located in Seattle. The reason they attracted my attention was their beautifully designed travel tumbler. The one I got from Teavana has broken a year ago and I was looking for a replacement. 

Alongside with the tumbler, I’ve ordered their largest sample box and Sunset Red Tea.  To be honest I was not expecting their teas to be that good; so I’m glad that I’ve placed the order. I guess I should come out of my comfort zone more often and try more different teas.

Sunset Red

Tea book Sunset Red Tea, taking its name after the warm reddish amber color of its liquor, comes from Fuding, Fujian. I’ve grown accustomed to Fujianese black teas (which might be the sweetest of all black teas) since I had the chance to sip on White 2 Tea Black Meizhan and since then I always try to keep some in my tea cupboard. 

Tasting Notes

Let’s dive into tasting notes of this week’s tea. First of all, the smell of dry leaves is mesmerizing; reminiscent of milk chocolate and caramel. They are composed of short, slightly curled black tea leaves alongside with some golden yellow tea buds. 

It cupped out orangish red liquor with great clarity. It’s sweet with a tad bitterness in the back. It’s not so strong but not so mellow either; perfect for an afternoon drink. Furthermore, the aftertaste was rather long and left a taste of dark chocolate notes in the throat.

Teabook Sunset Red Tea Teabook Sunset Red Tea Teabook Sunset Red Tea