Tea Review: Fresh Tea Stories High Mountain Green Tea

Fresh Tea Stories High Mountain Green Tea

This week’s tea, Fresh Tea Stories High Mountain Green Tea, comes from Sichuan province of China. It’s handmade and produced from tea leaves that grow at an altitude more than 1000 meters. Although Sichuan is not well known for its tea production compared to other provinces in China, you may encounter some good quality teas coming from this region.

The dry leaves are composed of short, curly and dark green tea leaves which are quite uniform in shape. I brewed it gongfu style using about five grams of tea. It cupped out slightly cloudy light green liquor. It’s smooth and sweet with almost no astringency.  There is some grassy taste particularly in the aftertaste but it’s nothing that bothers my palate. The second infusion was much stronger and produced a darker liquor compared to first one. I guess I should have brewed it shorter. The grassy taste much more dominant as well. I kept it short in the third infusion to get a more balanced liquor. Now it’s just as I like it! The aftertaste was quite persistent and left a nice refreshing energizing taste in the mouth.

Overall, Fresh Tea Stories High Mountain Green Tea, is a perfect everyday tea for green tea lovers.
Fresh Tea Stories High Mountain Green Tea Fresh Tea Stories High Mountain Green Tea Fresh Tea Stories High Mountain Green Tea

Tea Review: Eco-Cha Teas Ying Xiang High Mountain Black Tea

Eco Cha Teas Ying Xiang High Mountain Black Tea

This week’s tea, Eco-Cha Teas Ying Xiang High Mountain Black Tea, comes from Big Wheel Mountain in Shanlinxi region of Taiwan. It’s hand-picked and harvested in Summer 2017.

For most of us, Taiwan is almonds synonymous with exquisite fragrant ball-shaped oolongs. However, there are some great black teas coming from this beautiful island, particularly from Sun Moon Lake area. I’ve reviewed a few of them already, one from Global Tea Hut and another from The Jade Leaf. This week’s tea is another spectacular example of black teas coming from Taiwan. Dry leaves are composed of tightly rolled whole black tea leaves which are quite uniform in shape. The smell is both chocolaty and fruity.

I brewed it western style using about three grams of tea for my 150 ml glass teapot. It cupped out orangish red liquor with great clarity. The taste is quite smooth and sweet with no astringency at all. The sweetness is reminiscent of dark chocolate tones.  It’s so light and delicate without almost no strength. Yet it’s very rich in character. The aftertaste is not long but leaves a very gentle touch of sweetness and fruitiness in the mouth.

I must say I generally prefer stronger black teas so this one is too light for me. But simply because of this reason I loved this tea. It’s really hard to get a black tea which is as rich, smooth and delicate as much as this one.

Eco Cha Teas Ying Xiang High Mountain Black Tea Eco Cha Teas Ying Xiang High Mountain Black Tea Eco Cha Teas Ying Xiang High Mountain Black Tea Eco Cha Teas Ying Xiang High Mountain Black Tea Eco Cha Teas Ying Xiang High Mountain Black Tea

Tea Review: Whispering Pines Tea Laoshan Black Tea

  Whispering Pines Tea Laoshan Black Tea

This week’s tea, Whispering Pines Tea Laoshan Black Tea, comes from Laoshan village in Shandong province, China which is located in northern China. I’m not sure but this might be the first time I try any tea from this part of China. Although Laoshan village is better known for their green teas, black teas coming from Laoshan have gained popularity recently.

Dry leaves of this week’s tea are composed of short, slightly curly dark black tea leaves alongside with some yellow tea buds.

I brewed it Gongfu style using five grams of tea for one of my little gaiwans. It cupped out orangish red liquor with great clarity. It’s got a very strong malty taste.It’s got chocolaty sweetness with a little subtle touch of astringency in the background which makes it richer in taste. The taste profile combines some fruity tones as well, particularly citrusy ones such as lychee.

With the second infusion, it got much stronger and richer both taste-wise and aroma-wise. It’s not as strong as Fujian or Yunnan black teas but there is a nice, very complex touch of a flavor profile. The aftertaste was quite long and left a very strong, pungent taste both in the mouth and throat.

Overall, Whispering Pines Tea Laoshan Black Tea is a real treat for black tea lovers. Highly recommended!

Whispering Pines Tea Laoshan Black Tea Whispering Pines Tea Laoshan Black Tea

Tea Review: Morima Tea Anji Bai Cha Green Tea

Morima Tea Anji Bai Cha Green Tea

This week’s tea, Morima Tea Anji Bai Cha Green Tea, comes from Anji in Zhejiang. Anji Bai Cha literally means ‘Anji white tea’ although it’s got nothing to do with white tea. Dry leaves are composed of long, slender, needle-shaped tea leaves which are quite uniform in shape. The smell is quite floral and slightly grassy.

I brewed it Gongfu style using about five grams of tea. The first infusion cupped out pale green liquor with a slightly cloudy appearance. The taste was quite soft for my palate, I should have infused it longer I guess. The second infusion hit the target, stronger and richer. It’s rather sweet with almost no astringency. The taste is slightly grassy and has a hint of vegetable tones. The third infusion was much grassier and slightly bitter than the first two infusions. But it’s not something that bothers you, more like a nice bitter-sweet taste. Still, it’s quite soft on the palate. The aftertaste was not long but left a nice refreshing feeling in the mouth.

Overall, Morima Tea Anji Bai Cha Green Tea is a decent representation of this very unique and special tea. Highly recommended for Chinese green tea aficionados and lovers alike.

Morima Tea Anji Bai Cha Green Tea Morima Tea Anji Bai Cha Green Tea Morima Tea Anji Bai Cha Green Tea Morima Tea Anji Bai Cha Green Tea Morima Tea Anji Bai Cha Green Tea

Tea Review: Australia Arakai Estate Summer Black Tea

Australia Arakai Estate Summer Black Tea

This week’s tea, Australia Arakai Estate Summer Black Tea, is an award-winning black tea coming from Australia. I was lucky to visit Sydney last year and witness the tea culture of Australia. Although I had intended to visit Arakai Estate I did not have the chance to make it there. But thanks to What Cha Teas, finally I have been able to drink their teas. Arakai Tea Estate, founded by Brendon Collins in 2012, is located in Bellthorpe, Queensland. For the time being, they only produce green and black teas.

Dry leaves of this week’s tea are composed of short, slightly curly dark leaves and they are quite uniform in shape. I brewed it western style using about 3 grams of tea for a 150 ml teapot. It cupped out deep orangish red liquor with great clarity. It’s got a strong cinnamon-like taste with a slight bitterness in the background. The mouthfeel is thick and somewhat velvety. There is also some fruity tones deepening the richness of flavor profile. The aftertaste was quite short yet left nice refreshing freshness in the throat. It reminded me of Taiwanese black teas.

Overall, Arakai Estate Summer Black Tea is a very good quality black tea from Australia that I want to keep in my tea cupboard all the time.

Australia Arakai Estate Summer Black Tea Australia Arakai Estate Summer Black Tea Australia Arakai Estate Summer Black Tea